08 JUL 2016

What next following the Chilcot Report?

The independent Chilcot Report was expected to report rapidly, but such was the volume and detail of the evidence examined and the sensitivity of its conclusions that in the end it took seven years. It runs to 12 volumes and 2.6m words and the final summary should be compulsory reading for all who will in future be tasked with the heaviest decision for any government, to commit our forces to war. 179 British servicemen and women lost their lives alongside 24 British civilians and over 150,000 Iraqis. The consequences for their loved ones of our failures in Iraq have been appalling and the terrorism and violence continue to this day across the region and worldwide.

Chilcot is damning in his conclusions including that:

• Military action was not a last resort as all peaceful options had not been exhausted

• Policy on the Iraq invasion was made on the basis of flawed intelligence assessments. This assessment was not challenged as it should have been, preferably by an independent body

• The continuing threat from weapons of mass destruction was presented with unjust certainty

• The circumstances in which the legal basis for military action were established were "far from satisfactory" and the authority of the United Nations Security Council was undermined.

• There was too "little time" to properly prepare. The risks were neither "properly identified nor fully exposed" to ministers, leaving our troops dangerously exposed as a result of inadequate equipment.

• Plans for post-Saddam Iraq were wholly inadequate

• The consequences of the invasion were underestimated and this left a space for extremists to flourish.

I listened to Tony Blair's apology and his acceptance of responsibility but like many was aghast to hear that he would take the same course of action again.

Next week Parliament has dedicated two full days to debate this crucial report and how this should influence the future conduct of those who advise on or take the final decisions to take us to war. Whilst I do not feel that the lesson from the Chilcot Report is that we should never engage in military action, it should be a last resort and all future governments must make sure that the grave lessons are learnt from this catalogue of disasters.

8 comments

Sarah I honestly do feel you should return to your original career, as there is a great shortage of GP s. You seem in your political career to wander from this side to the other going in whichever way the wind blows or as a cynic might say whichever way is the more promising for your career. First you were for not bombing Syria and then when Mr Cameron asked you again you became a willing propagandist for RAF bombing . In the Brexit debate you ended up on the losing side after a last minute conversion giving some spurious reasons which were frankly risible. Your thoughts on Chilcot are just a repetition of the mainstream and appear glib. I see today you have hitched your wagon to Theresa May with a twitter comment . The Home secretary of course is the establishment pro Remain choice. The aim of the pro Remain group is to thwart the will of the people and to stay in the EU. If that is the aim and the end result then we truly do live in a dictatorship.
- Peter Thompson

@Peter Thompson Surely the behaviour you describe is ideally suited to being a politician but in a GP would be rather worrying. Though hardly unexpected, I am still a little surprised by the apparent relish with which former Remain politicians are embracing their role in taking us out. They told us how devastating it would be for the UK to leave. Now May for instance has been quoted as saying that we have a "better, brighter future" outside the EU. Surely, if leaving was a bad for our country before the referendum then it still is and former remainers should still be resisting our exit rather than blindly chanting "The People Have Spoken" @Dr Woolaston As you appear to be in the 'people have spoken' camp, don't forget that your constituents have spoken and they want to stay in.
- JW,Totnes

@jw,Totnes. The nation as a whole voted by a majority of over a million to leave the E.U. That may disappoint you but with a 72 % turn out it is pretty clear. Perhaps you feel that the South Hams should remain part of the EU by declaring itself independent ? Where would you put the border posts ?. You also make a significant error by confusing the boundaries of the Totnes constituency with the boundaries of the South Hams. The Totnes constituency contains Brixham which voted overwhelmingly to leave the E.U.
- Peter Thompson

@ Peter Thompson I admit that it was bit speculative of me to assume correlation between the South Hams and the Totnes constituency. However, I was not aware that separate figures for Brixham voting were available. Perhaps you could supply a reference for that so that we can work which way it went in the Totnes Constituency overall. Of course I am not suggesting independence for the S Hams. Please do not be so disingenuous as to suggest that I might subscribe to such a ridiculous notion. The Prime Minister, along with most(?) politicians from the main parties told us 'Brexit' would be a disaster for this country. I just wonder why many of them now seem so enthusiastic to proceed in that direction. I fear, coming back to your original point, that this is due to political expediency rather than a conviction of what is best for our country.
- JW, Totnes

@jw,Totnes. The vote in Torbay for Leave was 63 % on a turnout of 74 % and living and working in Brixham I would suggest the Leave proportion of the electorate was of this level if not higher . You do realise that it is a fishing port do you ? Here is a link to help you .. http://www.torquayheraldexpress.co.uk/brixham-s-fishing-port-celebrates-uk-s-vote-to-leave-eu/story-29439365-detail/story.html
-

@Peter Thompson I presume the anonymous comment above is from you. "You do realise that it is a fishing port do you ?" - No need for sarcasm. If we apply the Torbay percentages to the population of Brixham we get the following: Leave 7823, Remain 4555. Adding these to the S Hams result we get Leave 33965, Remain 33863. I agree that the Brigham result may have been better than that for the Leavers so I concede that there was likely to have been at least a small majority of leavers in the Totnes constituency. As a former member of the fishing community I have to say that I fear that they will not gain any great advantage from being out of the EU. I hope I'm wrong about that too.
- JW, Totnes

That should be '...'the Brixham result...' of course. Curse you autocorrect.
- JW, Totnes

Sarah we need a stronger lead from you to stop Hinkley Point: 1. Nuclear power is expensive - £18bn is too much plus EPR reactors in Finland and France are up to 7yrs late and £5bn overspent. 2. Nuclear power is unsafe - 1979 US Three Mile Island partial meltdown, 1986 USSR Chernobyl disaster, Japan 2011 Fukushima disaster, UK Windscale (cynically renamed Sellafield) disaster, repeat radioactive discharges to atmosphere and Irish Sea, clusters of nearby childhood leukaemia, falsified records, safety checks, management coverups. 3. Nuclear power is under foreign control - French government (EDF) own and operate eight of UK's ten existing nuclear power stations, plans to build three new ones. Chinese will part own Hinkley Point plus new project at Sizewell and will build their OWN reactors in Essex. The new designs have not worked anywhere and are completely unproven - and we will have no control. 4. Nuclear power is being phased out by most countries - Germany is closing all of its reactors, Belgium, Spain, and Sweden decided not to build new plants or will phase out nuclear entirely. Countries with no nuclear plants or restricting are Australia, Austria, Denmark, Greece, Italy, Ireland and Norway. 5. Spying on top - EDF partner at Hinkley Point, China General Nuclear Power, and senior adviser charged in the US conspiring to help Chinese government develop nuclear material in series of illicit transfers of US nuclear secrets. 6. Please show your support for wind, wave, solar and biomass with interim use of fossil fuel using CCS. National Grid say the country’s climate commitments achievable WITHOUT major increase in new nuclear - but only if Carbon Capture and Storage technology is developed on a large scale instead. But last November George Osborne cancelled a £1bn competition to help companies develop the technology, saying too expensive - worst decision ever. CCS is a technology that can capture up to 90% of the carbon dioxide emissions produced from the use of fossil fuels. And renewable biomass is one of the few carbon abatement technologies that can be used in a 'carbon-negative' mode actually taking carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. Please Sarah state your position and help Theresa May stop this madness.
- DRH Broadsands

Post a comment

Back to all posts